Dr Sabrina Lomax
People_

Dr Sabrina Lomax

BAnVetBioSc (Hons1); PhD;
Senior Lecturer in Livestock Behaviour and Welfare | School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Phone
+61 2 9351 1713
Fax
+61 2 4655 2374
Address
Dr Sabrina Lomax

Sabrina is a Senior Lecturer in livestock behaviour and welfare and a lead scientist in the Livestock Production and Welfare Group at the School of Life and Environmental Sciences. Her research is focused on promoting best practice livestock production through the integration of technology and animal behaviour and welfare science.

Sabrina’s family agricultural background led to her interest in animal health and production. She completed her PhD in 2011 examining topical anaesthesia for painful livestock husbandry procedures. Her post-doctoral research examined novel methods of pain assessment and alleviation, and focused on improving the welfare of extensively farmed livestock.

  • Livestock production and welfare
  • Pain mitigation
  • Animal behaviour and welfare science
  • Best practice livestock production
  • Industry and stakeholder engagement

Sabrina co-ordinates and teaches the Animal Behaviour and Welfare unit of study in the School of Life and Environmental Sciences. This unit has a focus on understanding the behavioural theories and processes, as well as the applied study of animal behaviour and welfare across wildlife, companion/performance animals and livestock.

Sabrina is the co-ordinator for the Animal and Veterinary Bioscience undergraduate Professional Experience (PE) program. This program is aimed at developing student's professional skills in a range of disciplines through work placement. Students participate in a variety of placements including on-farm, agriculture or animal-related businesses and research.

  • Objective, robust, real-time animal welfare measures for the red meat industry - Meat and Livestock Australia
  • Managing Pastures and Cattle for Maximum Productivity in NSW Grasslands - John and Betty Casey Trust Project, Sydney Institute of Agriculture
  • Enhancing the profitability and productivity of livestock farming through virtual herding technology – Rural R&D for Profit (Commonwealth Government)
  • Pain management for the red meat industry – Meat and Livestock Australia
  • Promoting welfare solutions for Australian merinos; Australian Wool Innovation
Animal production and welfare
Project titleResearch student
Unveiling the diversity of beef cattle production in extreme climates within extensive production systemsFaysal Mehedi HASAN
Innovative delivery of pain mitigation in routine animal husbandry and veterinary practiceLee METCALF
The Impact of Rumen Temperature on MicrobiomeShaheen RAHMAN
Novel Wound Treatment Strategies for Dehorning of CattleSamantha RUDD
An Investigation of Sow ParturitionAlexandra WALLS

Publications

Download citations: PDF; RTF; Endnote

Selected Grants

2022

  • Data driven system optimising the forage base for sustainable beef production, Lomax S, Clark C, Meat and Livestock Australia Ltd/Research and Development Grant

2017

  • Improving animal welfare in the red meat industry - pain relief, White P, Govendir M, Van der Saag D, Lomax S, Meat and Livestock Australia Ltd/Research and Development Grant
  • Objective, robust, real-time animal welfare measures for the Australian red meat industry, Clark C, Lomax S, Reynolds M, Xu Z, Sukkarieh S, Meat and Livestock Australia Ltd/Research and Development Grant
  • Enhancing the profitability and productivity of livestock farming through virtual herding technology, Clark C, Lomax S, Dairy Australia/Research and Development Grants

In the media

Scientific Media and rural press

  1. Dairy Australia – Virtual herding webinar November 2018 “Determining the best sub-herd and individual animal management for dairy and beef production systems”
  2. Dairy News2018 – “Farmers must extract more value from existing tech” https://www.dairynewsaustralia.com.au/@news/2018/09/21/246625/farmers-must-extract-more-value-from-existing-tech
  3. The LandNewspaper August 2018 – “Maintaining growth in calves can be helped with the use of pain relief at marking” https://www.theland.com.au/story/5567513/keep-the-kilos-with-pain-relief/
  4. Dairy Australia Virtual Herding Newsletter – “Virtual Herding Research Update; Update on Sub-Program 3 Activities: Determine best sub-herd and individual animal management for dairy and beef” – November 2018
  5. Dairy Australia Virtual Herding Newsletter – “Virtual Herding Research Update: Introducing project team members – Dr. Sabrina Lomax” – February 2018 file:///Users/sabrina/Downloads/2018%20February%20Virtual%20herding%20newsletter.pdf
  6. Dairy Australia Virtual Herding Newsletter – “Virtual Herding Research Update; Update on Animal Studies Sub-Program 3: Determine best sub-herd and individual animal management for dairy and beef” – May 2017

file:///Users/sabrina/Downloads/2017%20September%20Virtual%20herding%20Newsletter%20no%202%20(1).pdf

  1. ABCRural News 2017 – “Dairy farmers keeping close eye on virtual fencing research project”. http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-08-08/dairy-farmers-keep-close-eye-virtual-fencing-project/8784956
  2. YouTube Dairy SA innovation day – “Virtual Herding Technology”. June 2017 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxHst6c0lfI
  3. ABC’s Landline 2011 – interviewed Sabrina and her team during a research trial examining novel methods for peri-operative analgesia during castration and tail-docking in sheep http://www.abc.net.au/landline/content/2010/s3298418.htm
  4. The LandNewspaper, Stock & Land (July 28, 2011) rural press – feature articles on pain management for sheep husbandry procedures
  5. Lomax S, Windsor PA. The use of topical anaesthesia to minimise pain during castration of calves. RSPCA Animal Welfare Science Update 43, January 2013
  6. Lomax S, Dickson H, Sheil M and Windsor PA. Topical anaesthesia relieves the pain of castration and tail docking in lambs. RSPCA Animal Welfare Science Update 28, April 2010
  7. Lomax S, Sheil M and Windsor PA. Improving the welfare of lambs after mulesing. RSPCA Animal Welfare Science Update 21, July 2008